Available now on YouTube

We are pleased to announce that our latest Q&As with the authors of texts which featured recently in our Reading Group discussions are now available on YouTube.

Most recently, we spoke with Dr Hayes Mabweazara from University of Glasgow, author of the chapter: ‘A CLASH OF CULTURES: Pirate radio convergence and reception in Africa’ in the 2015 ‘Routledge Companion to Alternative and Community Media’, edited by Chris Atton.

Before that, we were delighted to have all three authors of ‘A Curriculum for Blackness: Podcasts as Discursive Cultural Guides, 2010-2020’ published in Journal of Radio & Audio Media (2020): Kim Fox, Dr David O. Dowling and Dr Kyle Miller.

Q&As for March 2021

We are pleased to announce a series of Q & As to tie in with last term’s online reading group discussions. You are invited to attend to hear what the authors have to share regarding their article/chapter and their research more widely.
You will be encouraged to ask questions and join in the discussion.

Our first session takes place on Friday 5th March at 7pm UK time. The following two Fridays, we will be meeting at 9am UK time. We hope this scheduling enables as many of our international contributors and Online Reading Group members to attend relatively easily.

SESSION ONE:

5th March, 7pm GMT
Kim Fox (The American University in Cairo), David Dowling (University of Iowa) and Kyle Miller (University of South Dakota)

2020 article, ‘A Curriculum for Blackness: Podcasts as Discursive Cultural Guides, 2010-2020’. Journal of Radio & Audio Media, 27(2), 298-318.

We look forward to finding out more about their research, what it was like studying a field so current, diverse and dynamic, and how they worked as a team to write their article.

SESSION TWO:

12th March, 9am GMT
Hayes Mabweazara (University of Glasgow)

2015 chapter, ‘A clash of cultures:’ pirate radio convergence and reception in Africa’ from Chris Atton’s The Routledge Companion to Alternative and Community Media.

We hope to find out more about Hayes’ research methodology behind this chapter, such as how interviewing producers compared with his encounters with listeners. Hayes currently explores new media and journalism practice in Africa and the wider global South, so we look forward to learning more about these interests.

SESSION THREE:

19th March, 9am GMT
Peter Mathews Mhagama (The Polytechnic, University of Malawi)

‘Donor Funding to Community Radio Stations in Malawi and its Impact on their Performance’ in the Journal of Southern African Studies, 2015, Vol. 41, No. 6, 1301–1314.

Peter’s research interests are broader than ‘simply’ radio studies, covering issues like political journalism, so we want to find out more about the radio stations he has visited and what else his findings suggest, such as how the impacts and implications of donor funding are replicated elsewhere in Africa, and what policy solutions there may be.

For the Zoom Invitation, please message us via the Contact Page.

About us: Jan 2021

We are a group of postgraduates, early career researchers and educators in radio, audio and podcast studies. We gather together regularly for terms of either weekly or fortnightly sessions to discuss academic articles pertaining to the audio medium and our disciplines. We cover a range of aspects such as political economy and technological, as well as the social and cultural status of the various sound-based practices. The group was started by Helen Gubbins (doctoral researcher at the University of Sheffield) and is now organised by Jerry Padfield (doctoral student at Falmouth University).

Supported by Josephine Coleman (Publicity Exec. for the Radio Studies Network and lecturer at Brunel University) and Kim Fox (American University in Cairo), we continue to run our meetings over online meeting platforms to enable researchers based in as many locations as possible to take part. We welcome researchers to ‘drop in’ on our discussions based on their availability. We aim to choose articles that are as available or open access as possible.

Our first event of the New Year is another of our 5 x 5 Sandbox Sessions. This is taking place on Friday 8th January at 8pm (UK time). If you are interested in contributing a five-minute spiel about your work, ideas or aspirations accompanied by just 5 slides (or up to 5 slides!), do let us know by contacting us on the Contact Page. If you would like to just ‘come along’ to watch and join in the discussions, this is a free event, and you are more than welcome. Again, just register your interest and we will send you the Zoom Invitation.

Read more about the UK-based MeCCSA here and the MeCCSA Radio Studies Network here.

AUTUMN TERM 2020 – Celebrating diversity and the work of Black academics.

Through November and December 2020, as we head towards the end of this difficult year, and hopefully the beginning of a happier and healthier one, we are taking the opportunity to focus our online discussions around the published work of Black academics. We’re really excited about this list, and are looking forward to sharing our thoughts on the research and topics raised, so that we can learn and be inspired in our own academic endeavours.

The meetings will last one hour, and will take place on Zoom. Please message us for the joining instructions nearer the time.

a)  Monday 2nd Nov, 12:00 UTC

Catherine R. Squires (2000)  ‘Black Talk Radio. Defining Community Needs and Identity’ in The International Journal of Press/Politics, Vol 5, issue 2, 73-95

https://doi.org/10.1177/1081180X00005002006

This article presents research concerning the relationship between media and public spheres though an investigation of an African-American-owned and -operated talk-radio station in Chicago. The article concludes that, contrary to some scholars’ pessimistic view of commercial media’s role in the decline of the public sphere, the radio station portrayed her is an integral and useful institution for the Black public sphere in Chicago. The study reveals how Africa-American community members and listeners use the station as a public forum wherein traditional political concerns, as well as identity politics, are aired and discussed. Furthermore, the article argues that is it precisely because the station is owned and operated by Blacks that is it able to draw and sustain a substantial and loyal audience. Because they trust the station to “talk their talk”, community members are enthusiastic about participating in the station’s conversational activities and are even willing to make personal financial contributions when advertising revenue is low.

b)  16th Nov, 12:00 UTC

Peter Mhagama (2015) ‘Donor Funding to Community Radio Stations in Malawi and its Impact on their Performance’ in Journal of Southern African Studies, 2015, Vol. 41, No. 6, 1301–1314, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057070.2015.1116233

Abstract:

Many community radio stations in developing countries rely on donor funding for their sustainability. This raises some questions with regard to how they fulfil their social mission of promoting the participation of the community in the activities of the radio. This article examines how donor funding to community radio stations can affect the performance of the stations, because it has potential to divert the attention of the stations from serving the community to broadcasting externally produced programmes. Based on a case study of Nkhotakota community radio station in Malawi, data were collected through face-to-face interviews with key informants and focus-group discussions with the listeners of the station. The article argues that donor funding, though important for the sustainability of the stations, can erode their identity, because they start concentrating on attracting donors to sponsor programmes. These donors also start to influence the agendas of community radio stations. The article concludes that, overall, the participation of ordinary people in the media is negatively affected.

c)   30th Nov, 12:00 UTC

Fox, K., Dowling, D. O., & Miller, K. (2020). A Curriculum for Blackness: Podcasts as Discursive Cultural Guides, 2010-2020. Journal of Radio & Audio Media, 27(2), 298-318. https://doi.org/10.1080/19376529.2020.1801687

Abstract:

African-American podcasting’s ascent marks a potent articulation of Black identity and experience in media history, one reaching an unprecedented range of audiences, dialogs, and online communities. This study examines how content, production practices, and digital audiences for Black podcasting generate a metaphorical curriculum for blackness, a set of discursive cultural guides for listeners. Case studies representative of major genres and publishing sectors where Black podcasting flourished from 2010 to 2020 include humorous commentary on popular entertainment in The Read (2013-), independent media’s exploration of Black life in The Nod (2014–2020), and legacy media’s in-depth cultural criticism and analysis in Still Processing (2016-).

d) 14th Dec, 12:00 UTC

Hayes Mabweazara(2015)’A clash of cultures:’ pirate radio convergence and reception in Africa’. In: Atton, C. (ed.) The Routledge Companion to Alternative and Community Media. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group: London, pp. 494-504. ISBN 9780415644044

First 5 x 5 Sandbox session recording available online

Our first 5×5 sandbox session went very well in the summer.

We were delighted to watch presentations from:

Dr Gurvinder Aujla-Sidhu (De Montfort University, UK)
Lori Beckstead (Ryerson University, Canada)
Leon Clowes (Reel Rebels Radio, UK)
Dr Josephine Coleman (Brunel University, UK)
Jerry Padfield (Falmouth University, UK)
Dylan Bird (Swinburne University of Technology, Australia)
Kim Fox (American University in Cairo, Egypt)

In case you missed it, and any of the posts afterwards on our social media, here is a reminder of the link to the YouTube page where you can view it again: https://youtu.be/383VcpaEgIA

We hope to put on another sesssion in early January 2021, so if you are interested in sharing your ongoing research interests, using just five slides in five minutes, contact us to get your name scratched on the board!

5 x 5 Sandbox Session

5x5 sandbox 2020

We are trialling something new with our Online Reading Group – it’s a 5 x 5 sandbox session, based loosely on the notion of Pecha Kucha, combined with the idea behind the Three Minute Thesis Competition, and that essential element of our academic practice: the art of the elevator pitch!

The aim for this meeting is, as ever, to provide a comfortable, inspiring online environment where we can converse and discuss radio, podcast and audio studies. The 5 x 5 session will provide an opportunity to network, share research findings and brainstorm future areas of research and even potentially to sow the seeds of collaboration.

It will enable ECRs and PGs, as well as established lecturers and supervisors, to present ongoing research or ideas for future projects using FIVE slides in FIVE minutes.

Anything sound-related will be considered: audio journalism, local and/or community radio, critical studies of radio, audio production, podcasting and so forth. For instance, Jo Coleman (with a PhD from Birkbeck) will present on her recent research into how UK community radio stations responded to the lockdown, and Jerry Padfield (doctoral student at Falmouth) will present on his FOI request to Ofcom relating to his research interest in the underrepresentation of women and other groups in community radio in the UK and the underlying gatekeeping and misogyny.

Register with us in advance or just turn up on the day to join in.
We’ll be meeting on Zoom on Monday 17th August, 14:00 BST.
For joining instructions, message using the Contact Us page or email radiostudiesnetwork@gmail.com

“Community Radio is a Space of Care”: discuss!

Our second Q & A is now available on the new YouTube channel set up to complement our series of online reading group discussions. You can find the session with Dr Paula Serafini of the University of Leicester here.

She goes into great detail about her fascinating research which was brilliantly written up in the 2019 article: ‘Community Radio as a Space of Care: An Ecofeminist Perspective on Media Production in Environmental Conflicts’, published in the International Journal of Communication 13, pp. 5444–5462.

We will post news soon of our next term of readings, which will be selected to celebrate the diversity of international researchers and experts in our field; in particular the work of some esteemed Black colleagues.

 

Paula on YouTube

 

Reading Group Q&A video goes online

We are delighted to announce that the 1st *ever* author Q&A, conducted as part of our radio/audio text discussions series, has been recorded and is now available on our new YouTube channel for the Online Reading Group for PGs and ECRs.
Many thanks to Jerry Padfield (doctoral student at Falmouth University) and Kim Fox (American University in Cairo) for facilitating this new direction in our project and to Rute Correia too for being our first author.
Rutes video

June 2020 update – diversity matters!

The recent events in the USA have been shocking, all the more so, because at the epicentre is the issue of racism which is abhorrent and does not have a place in society. Anywhere.
We are conscious that these events, and the issues of systemic racism which underpin them, are having a profound impact on members of our academic community.
We understand that we have an important role to play as an agent of societal change and that we need to do more to take action against racism and inequality. Statements of intent are not enough if not matched by action.
The MeCCSA Radio Studies Network in the UK, part of the international radio studies community, encourages and fosters research into radio and audio studies for all. We aim to do this with and for scholars, researchers and educators not simply ‘regardless’ of ethnicity, creed or culture but in a spirit of amplifying those voices which have been sidelined or suppressed in academia in the past.
As part of our commitment to this end, we are dedicating the next term of our Online Reading Group for Early Career Researchers and Postgraduates to discussing and celebrating the publications and outputs of Black academics. Moving forwards, we will continue to ensure that we are inclusive in all that we do, equipping and enabling the next generation in our field to be more diverse and representative of ethnic minorities and other under-represented groups like LGBTQIA+.
We are currently curating a list of academic articles on audio and radio, and research outputs pertaining to the audio medium by Black academics. We hold our reading discussion sessions online to enable early career researchers and postgraduate students based in as many locations as possible to take part. We welcome more established researchers/educators to ‘drop in’ on our discussions based on their availability.

The group is now organised by Jerry Padfield (doctoral student at Falmouth University). Supported by Kim Fox (American University in Cairo) and Jo Coleman (Social Media Officer for the RSN and Lecturer in Media Studies ad PR at Brunel University London).

Read more about the UK-based MeCCSA here and the MeCCSA Radio Studies Network here.

 

Update

We are a group of postgraduates, early career researchers and educators in radio, audio and podcast studies. We gather together regularly for terms of either weekly or fortnightly sessions to discuss academic articles pertaining to the audio medium and our disciplines. We cover a range of aspects such as political economy and technological, as well as the social and cultural status of the various sound-based practices. The group was started by Helen Gubbins (doctoral researcher at the University of Sheffield) and is now organised by Jo Coleman (Publicity Exec. for the Radio Studies Network and doctoral researcher at Birkbeck, University of London).

Supported by Kim Fox (American University in Cairo) and Jerry Padfield (doctoral student at Falmouth University), we will continue to run our meetings over online meeting platforms to enable researchers based in as many locations as possible to take part. We welcome researchers to ‘drop in’ on our discussions based on their availability. We aim to choose articles that are as open access as possible.

Read more about the UK-based MeCCSA here and the MeCCSA Radio Studies Network here.